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Anthony Cary

Commonwealth Scholarship Commissioner,

Anthony Cary holds an MA in English Language and Literature from Oxford University and an MBA from Stanford Business School. He served in the British Diplomatic Service from 1973-2011, in Berlin, Kuala Lumpur, Washington DC, as British Ambassador to Sweden, and finally as British High Commissioner to Canada from 2007 to 2010. In London, he was on the Policy Planning Staff, and headed the European Union Department. He was twice seconded to the European Commission in Brussels, where he was chief of staff to Chris Patten as Commissioner for External Relations. He was made a Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George (CMG) in 1997. He is currently a British Commissioner of the Commonwealth Scholarship and Fellowship Plan. 

Anthony Cary

Garvin Brown

Board Chairman, Brown-Forman

Geo. Garvin Brown IV is Executive Vice President of Brown-Forman Corporation. He provides executive leadership and planning on strategic and operational matters related to the Board of Directors and the Brown family, which controls a majority of the company’s voting shares of stock. Also, Brown serves as Presiding Chair of the Board of Directors and Co-Chair of the Brown-Forman/Brown Family Shareholders Committee. Brown is a graduate of McGill University, with master’s degrees from the University of British Colombia (in political science) and London Business School (MBA).

Garvin Brown

Marla R. Miller

Professor & Director, Public History Program;
Graduate Program Director, University of Massachusetts

Marla Miller's primary research interest is U.S. women's work before industrialization. Her book The Needle's Eye: Women and Work in the Age of Revolution appeared from the University of Massachusetts Press in August 2006, and won the Costume Society of America's Millia Davenport Publication Award for the best book in the field for that year. In 2009 she published an edited collection Cultivating a Past: Essays in the History of Hadley, Massachusetts, also with the University of Massachusetts Press. Her most recent book, Betsy Ross and the Making of America (Holt, 2010)--a scholarly biography of that much-misunderstood early American craftswoman--was a finalist for the Cundill Prize in History at McGill University, and was named to the Washington Post's "Best of 2010" list. She is presently completing work on a microhistory of women, work and landscape in Federal Massachusetts, and a short biography of Massachusetts gownmaker Rebecca Dickinson. As Director of the History Department's Public History program, Marla also teaches courses in Public History, American Material Culture, Museum and Historic Site Interpretation, and Writing History for Popular Audiences; she also serves as editor of the UMass Press series "Public History in Historical Perspective."  She continues to consult with a wide variety of museums and historic sites. In 2012, she and three co-authors released Imperiled Promise: The State of History in the National Park Service, a multi-year study funded by the NPS Chief Historian's office and hosted by the Organization of American Historians. In 2013, Imperiled Promise won the National Council on Public History prize for Excellence in Consulting.

Marla R. Miller

Sergio Luzzatto

Modern History Professor, University of Turin;
Winner of the Cundill Prize in 2011 for his book “Padre Pio: Miracles and Politics in a Secular Age”,

Born in Genova in 1963 and studied History in Pisa, Paris and New York. He lives between Turin, where he teaches at the University, and Geneva, where his wife and three children live. His major works are about Eighteenth and Nineteenth-century French history and Twentieth-century Italian history. He is the author of L’autunno della Rivoluzione (1994), Il corpo del duce (1998), Il Terrore ricordato (2000), Padre Pio (2007), Bonbon Robespierre (2009), La mummia della repubblica (2011), and of two pamphlets about civil engagement: La crisi dell’antifascismo (2004) e Il crocifisso di Stato (2011). He also edited the two-volume Dizionario del fascismo (2002-03, together with Victoria de Grazia), and the three-volume Atlante della letteratura italiana (2010-12, with Gabriele Pedullà). His books have been translated into English, French, German and Japanese. He was shortlisted for the Premio Viareggio in 1999 (Il corpo del duce) and 2008 (Padre Pio), while in 2009 he won the Premio Bari for Bonbon Robespierre and in 2011 he was awarded the prestigious Cundill Prize for the American edition of his book about Padre Pio (Padre Pio: Miracles and Politics in a Secular Age). He has written for the Corriere della Sera for many years and he is now a regular contributor to the Sole 24 Ore Sunday supplement. His articles have been collected in three volumes: Sangue d’Italia (2008), I popoli felici non hanno storia (2009), Presente storico (2012).

Sergio Luzzatto

Thomas H. B. Symons

C.C. O.Ont., FRSC, LL.D., D.U., D.Litt., D.Cn.L., FRGS, KSS.,

Professor Tom Symons is a teacher and writer in the field of Canadian Studies and public policy. He has written extensively on intellectual, cultural, and historical issues, and on international academic and cultural relations. He is the Founding President of Trent University, serving as its President and Vice-Chancellor from 1961 to 1972, and since that time as Vanier Professor and Vanier Professor Emeritus. He was appointed to the Board of Directors of the Ontario Heritage Trust in 2006, and became Chairman in 2010. Professor Symons served as Chairman of the Commission on Canadian Studies from 1972 to 1984 at the request of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC), and as Chairman of the Commission on Commonwealth Studies from 1995-1996 at the request of the Commonwealth Secretary General. He was Chairman of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada for the decade from 1986 to 1996, and Chair of the Canadian Polar Research Commission in 1988. He is a Member of Council of the Historica Foundation, a Member of the Council of Advisors of the Heritage Canada Foundation, and a Governor of the Fathers of Confederation Buildings Trust in Charlottetown. Professor Symons is Honorary President of the Peterborough Historical Society, Past Chair of the Council of the Canadian Canoe Museum, Founding Chair of the Canadian Association in Support of the Native Peoples, Chair Emeritus of the Peterborough Lakefield Police Services Board, and served on the Panel appointed by the Canadian Government to report on the Future of the Trent-Severn Waterway, 2007-2008. He has also served as Chair of the National Library Advisory Board, Chair of the National Statistics Council, Vice-Chair of the National Capital Planning Committee, Chair of the Ontario Human Rights Commission, Chairman of the 500 plus-member Association of Universities of the Commonwealth, and Chair of the International Board of United World Colleges. Professor Symons became an Officer of the Order of Canada in 1976 and a Companion of the Order of Canada in 1997. He was appointed a member of the Order of Ontario in 2002. In 2012, Professor Symons was awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal, and received a Knighthood from the Vatican in the Order of Saint Sylvester.

Thomas H. B. Symons